Saving Energy – One Lightbulb At A Time

CFL

CFL (Compact Fluorescent Light) bulbs are now talk of the town. Lot of companies are touting their energy saving benefits. Are they really worth investing in? Let’s check.

Here is an interesting article. The table of comparison from that article is as follows.

Type of bulb 60 Watt Regular 15 Watt CFL
Price of one bulb $0.50 $5.00
Number of bulbs purchased in 5 yrs 8 1
Total cost of bulbs $4.00 $5.00
Total cost of electricity* $36.00 $9.00
YOUR TOTAL COST $40.00 $14.00

*assuming 100 hrs/month of use at 10¢/kWh

Clearly the CFL bulb is easy on your pocket over a longer period of time. Great news.

Greater news lies ahead. In this span of time, CFL buld would have used 45W less energy than the regular bulb. With the given assumption of 100 hrs/month use, within a year, you would end up saving 100 x 12 x 45 = 54 KWH of energy.

I was going to do this calculation allover again. But I found several interesting places that have already done this calculation. Why reinvent the wheel, right? So here are the links and conclusions

This page straight from government website of “Energy Star”, mentions that “If every American home replaced just one light bulb with an ENERGY STAR CFL, we would save enough energy to light more than 2.5 million homes for a year and prevent greenhouse gases equivalent to the emissions of nearly 800,000 cars.” This should come as no surprise. As mentioned in previous post, lighting consumes almost 12% of total consumed power. A small gain in lighting efficiency would make a huge difference.

The article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_fluorescent_lamp from Wikipedia provides lots of details about CFL and its benefits. Really nice one. Worth a read.

~ by Kedar on December 24, 2006.

2 Responses to “Saving Energy – One Lightbulb At A Time”

  1. Wind Power

    A wind farm in Germany. Source: Bodoklecksel, Wikipedia
    Wind power, as a form of so-called green energy, has been slowly gaining popularity. It has several disadvantages—as with other methods of energy production, the manufacture and maintenance of …

  2. Although I’m using CFLs since I move to my own home, I never really saw a side-by-side comparison between CFLs and regular light bulbs until now–after reading your post. This is cool!

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